Sophia's Flushing Guidebook

Sophia

Sophia's Flushing Guidebook

Neighborhoods
Flushing is a neighborhood in the north-central portion of the New York City borough of Queens. The neighborhood is the fourth-largest central business district in New York City. Downtown Flushing, a major commercial and retail area centered around the intersection of Main Street and Roosevelt Avenue, is the third-busiest intersection in New York City, behind Times and Herald Squares. Flushing was established as a settlement of New Netherland on October 10, 1645, on the eastern bank of Flushing Creek. It was named Vlissingen, after the Dutch city of Vlissingen. The English took control of New Amsterdam in 1664, and when Queens County was established in 1683, the "Town of Flushing" was one of the original five towns of Queens. In 1898, Flushing was consolidated into the City of New York. Development came in the early 20th century with the construction of bridges and public transportation. An immigrant population, composed mostly of Chinese and Koreans, settled in Flushing in the late 20th century. Flushing contains numerous residential subsections, and its diversity is reflected by the numerous ethnic groups that reside there. Flushing is served by several stations on the Long Island Rail Road's Port Washington Branch, as well as the New York City Subway's IRT Flushing Line (7 and <7>​ trains), which has its terminus at Main Street. Flushing is located in Queens Community District 7, and its ZIP Codes are 11354, 11355, and 11358. It is patrolled by the New York City Police Department's 109th Precinct.
Downtown Flushing
Flushing is a neighborhood in the north-central portion of the New York City borough of Queens. The neighborhood is the fourth-largest central business district in New York City. Downtown Flushing, a major commercial and retail area centered around the intersection of Main Street and Roosevelt Avenue, is the third-busiest intersection in New York City, behind Times and Herald Squares. Flushing was established as a settlement of New Netherland on October 10, 1645, on the eastern bank of Flushing Creek. It was named Vlissingen, after the Dutch city of Vlissingen. The English took control of New Amsterdam in 1664, and when Queens County was established in 1683, the "Town of Flushing" was one of the original five towns of Queens. In 1898, Flushing was consolidated into the City of New York. Development came in the early 20th century with the construction of bridges and public transportation. An immigrant population, composed mostly of Chinese and Koreans, settled in Flushing in the late 20th century. Flushing contains numerous residential subsections, and its diversity is reflected by the numerous ethnic groups that reside there. Flushing is served by several stations on the Long Island Rail Road's Port Washington Branch, as well as the New York City Subway's IRT Flushing Line (7 and <7>​ trains), which has its terminus at Main Street. Flushing is located in Queens Community District 7, and its ZIP Codes are 11354, 11355, and 11358. It is patrolled by the New York City Police Department's 109th Precinct.
Murray Hill is bounded by 150th Street to the west and 160th Street to the east and straddles ZIP Codes 11354, 11355, and 11358. Traditionally the home of families of Irish and Italian immigrants, many Korean and Chinese immigrants have moved into Murray Hill in recent years. Murray Hill within Flushing is often confused with the larger Murray Hill neighborhood on the East Side of Manhattan. Before the area was developed for residential housing in 1889, Murray Hill was the location of several large nurseries owned by the King, Murray, and Parsons families. The Kingsland Homestead has been preserved as the home of the Queens Historical Society. The Voelker Orth Museum, Bird Sanctuary and Victorian Garden is also located in Murray Hill.
Murray Hill
Murray Hill is bounded by 150th Street to the west and 160th Street to the east and straddles ZIP Codes 11354, 11355, and 11358. Traditionally the home of families of Irish and Italian immigrants, many Korean and Chinese immigrants have moved into Murray Hill in recent years. Murray Hill within Flushing is often confused with the larger Murray Hill neighborhood on the East Side of Manhattan. Before the area was developed for residential housing in 1889, Murray Hill was the location of several large nurseries owned by the King, Murray, and Parsons families. The Kingsland Homestead has been preserved as the home of the Queens Historical Society. The Voelker Orth Museum, Bird Sanctuary and Victorian Garden is also located in Murray Hill.
Food Scene
Since Caldor went out of business 12 years ago, this 165,000 square foot site location at the corner of Roosevelt Avenue and Main Street in Flushing has been left empty. Many attempts to develop the property have failed, until the New World Group, owned by several prominent Chinese businessmen, successfully leased the site from Vornado Realty in early 2009, with a vision and plan to construct one of the largest indoor Asian Mall in the Northeast. The project took more than two years to complete due to the complexity of the location and other factors. Located in the heart of downtown Flushing and a short distance away from other heavily populated Queens neighborhoods, NWM stands to attract thousands of residents within the areas. The stunning three-story, cross-hatched window wall of clear glass on the exterior of the building has already received rave reviews from local community publications. This beautiful new mall is sure to enhance the appearance of the busiest block in Flushing and it reflects the company’s commitment to the community. The Mall expects to create over 1,000 new jobs and to promote social and economic awareness by hosting various community events and programs throughout the year. The mall features 108 retail shops with an Asian supermarket on the first and second levels. Located on the third floor is one of the largest Chinese dim sum restaurants and banquet halls in the Tri-State areas with a capacity of hosting 1,500 patrons. The facility also includes a food court, supermarket, karaoke lounge and an underground valet parking garage.
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New World Mall
136 Roosvelt Ave
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Since Caldor went out of business 12 years ago, this 165,000 square foot site location at the corner of Roosevelt Avenue and Main Street in Flushing has been left empty. Many attempts to develop the property have failed, until the New World Group, owned by several prominent Chinese businessmen, successfully leased the site from Vornado Realty in early 2009, with a vision and plan to construct one of the largest indoor Asian Mall in the Northeast. The project took more than two years to complete due to the complexity of the location and other factors. Located in the heart of downtown Flushing and a short distance away from other heavily populated Queens neighborhoods, NWM stands to attract thousands of residents within the areas. The stunning three-story, cross-hatched window wall of clear glass on the exterior of the building has already received rave reviews from local community publications. This beautiful new mall is sure to enhance the appearance of the busiest block in Flushing and it reflects the company’s commitment to the community. The Mall expects to create over 1,000 new jobs and to promote social and economic awareness by hosting various community events and programs throughout the year. The mall features 108 retail shops with an Asian supermarket on the first and second levels. Located on the third floor is one of the largest Chinese dim sum restaurants and banquet halls in the Tri-State areas with a capacity of hosting 1,500 patrons. The facility also includes a food court, supermarket, karaoke lounge and an underground valet parking garage.
One Fulton Square offers a curated selection of authentic Asian eateries, including Chinese, Korean, Japanese, Malaysian and Taiwanese options. These bustling restaurants and bars are a vibrant addition to the nightlife of downtown Flushing and further advance the development of this flourishing neighborhood.
One Fulton Square
39-16 Prince St
One Fulton Square offers a curated selection of authentic Asian eateries, including Chinese, Korean, Japanese, Malaysian and Taiwanese options. These bustling restaurants and bars are a vibrant addition to the nightlife of downtown Flushing and further advance the development of this flourishing neighborhood.
Mikkeller NYC is a 10,000-square-foot brewery, bar, and dining space at Citi Field in Flushing, Queens. This is the first U.S. Mikkeller location outside of California and the 32nd worldwide. At the heart of the brewery are 60 rotating taps pouring brews from Mikkeller NYC, Mikkeller SD, Mikkeller Denmark, and select friends, all of which can be enjoyed at the bar. Or perhaps you'd prefer to sit in our 120-seat communal dining area, where eats courtesy of Pat LaFrieda Meat Purveyors, Great Northern Food Hall’s Claus Meyer, Whitman’s, and Queens’ own Unidentified Flying Chickens are served alongside Henry Hops IPA and Say Hey Sally Pilsner (two of Mikkeller’s “ballpark beers”), other new recipes brewed on-site, and a variety of guest beers. Cans, bottles, and merchandise, all designed by Mikkeller Art Director Keith Shore, are available to take home from an on-site shop along with offerings from MKNYC’s friends from other select breweries. Shore’s bold, colorful artwork, beloved by Mikkeller fans and design aficionados alike, can also be admired in the space, where a tremendous window mural depicts baserunner Henry Hops sliding towards home with catcher Say Hey Sally defending the plate. Visible from the dining space is a vast beer production area open to public tours. A 20-barrel brewhouse, several vertically-stacked 20-barrel fermenters, and a canning line allow Mikkeller to provide fresh and varied brews on a weekly basis. Mikkeller NYC is Mikkeller’s first location connected to a professional sports venue anywhere and is open to the public year round. We have created a space that is equal parts game day hub, beer-geek destination, and neighborhood watering hole.
Mikkeller Brewing NYC
123-01 Roosevelt Avenue
Mikkeller NYC is a 10,000-square-foot brewery, bar, and dining space at Citi Field in Flushing, Queens. This is the first U.S. Mikkeller location outside of California and the 32nd worldwide. At the heart of the brewery are 60 rotating taps pouring brews from Mikkeller NYC, Mikkeller SD, Mikkeller Denmark, and select friends, all of which can be enjoyed at the bar. Or perhaps you'd prefer to sit in our 120-seat communal dining area, where eats courtesy of Pat LaFrieda Meat Purveyors, Great Northern Food Hall’s Claus Meyer, Whitman’s, and Queens’ own Unidentified Flying Chickens are served alongside Henry Hops IPA and Say Hey Sally Pilsner (two of Mikkeller’s “ballpark beers”), other new recipes brewed on-site, and a variety of guest beers. Cans, bottles, and merchandise, all designed by Mikkeller Art Director Keith Shore, are available to take home from an on-site shop along with offerings from MKNYC’s friends from other select breweries. Shore’s bold, colorful artwork, beloved by Mikkeller fans and design aficionados alike, can also be admired in the space, where a tremendous window mural depicts baserunner Henry Hops sliding towards home with catcher Say Hey Sally defending the plate. Visible from the dining space is a vast beer production area open to public tours. A 20-barrel brewhouse, several vertically-stacked 20-barrel fermenters, and a canning line allow Mikkeller to provide fresh and varied brews on a weekly basis. Mikkeller NYC is Mikkeller’s first location connected to a professional sports venue anywhere and is open to the public year round. We have created a space that is equal parts game day hub, beer-geek destination, and neighborhood watering hole.
Bustling food court with many stalls dispensing sweet & savory regional Chinese specialties.
New York Food Court
133-35 Roosevelt Ave
Bustling food court with many stalls dispensing sweet & savory regional Chinese specialties.
The Queens International Night Market is a large, family-friendly open-air night market in Queens, featuring up to 100 independent vendors selling merchandise, art, and food and featuring small-scale cultural performances, all celebrating the rich cultural diversity and heritage of NYC and Queens. Due to very limited parking availability, we strongly encourage visitors to take mass transit. SUBWAY: Take the 7 train to the 111th Street station. Walk south 4 blocks until you pass under an overpass. You will see the Night Market behind the New York Hall of Science on the Left. BUS: Take the Q23 or Q58 to Corona Avenue x 108 Street or the Q48 to 111 Street x Roosevelt Avenue.
Queens Night Market
The Queens International Night Market is a large, family-friendly open-air night market in Queens, featuring up to 100 independent vendors selling merchandise, art, and food and featuring small-scale cultural performances, all celebrating the rich cultural diversity and heritage of NYC and Queens. Due to very limited parking availability, we strongly encourage visitors to take mass transit. SUBWAY: Take the 7 train to the 111th Street station. Walk south 4 blocks until you pass under an overpass. You will see the Night Market behind the New York Hall of Science on the Left. BUS: Take the Q23 or Q58 to Corona Avenue x 108 Street or the Q48 to 111 Street x Roosevelt Avenue.
Shopping
Located in downtown Flushing, Queens, The Shops at SkyView Center is the regions largest multi level shopping destination.
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The Shops at SkyView Center
40-24 College Point Boulevard
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Located in downtown Flushing, Queens, The Shops at SkyView Center is the regions largest multi level shopping destination.
Macy’s, established in 1858, is the Great American Department Store—an iconic retailing brand over 740 stores operating coast-to-coast and online. Macy's offers a first-class selection of top fashion brands including Ralph Lauren, Calvin Klein, Clinique, Estée Lauder & Levi’s®. In addition to shoes and clothing, Macy's has a wide variety of housewares, gifts and furniture in select stores. Plan your visit to 13650 Roosevelt Ave, Flushing, NY!
Macy's
136-50 Roosevelt Avenue
Macy’s, established in 1858, is the Great American Department Store—an iconic retailing brand over 740 stores operating coast-to-coast and online. Macy's offers a first-class selection of top fashion brands including Ralph Lauren, Calvin Klein, Clinique, Estée Lauder & Levi’s®. In addition to shoes and clothing, Macy's has a wide variety of housewares, gifts and furniture in select stores. Plan your visit to 13650 Roosevelt Ave, Flushing, NY!
Welcome to a place filled with life, yet removed from the bustle and congestion of the city. A place to see a movie with the family, buy your groceries for the week shop for clothes for the kids or that special something for yourself. Even mail a package and handle your banking. A place that’s right in the neighborhood, filled with merchants who still understand that service is more than just a word – it’s everything. A special place to meet with family and friends, to have some fun, share a moment, and experience the best that The Bay Terrace Shopping Center has to offer. It’s all right here. You’re always welcome at The Bay Terrace.
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The Bay Terrace
23-98 Bell Boulevard
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Welcome to a place filled with life, yet removed from the bustle and congestion of the city. A place to see a movie with the family, buy your groceries for the week shop for clothes for the kids or that special something for yourself. Even mail a package and handle your banking. A place that’s right in the neighborhood, filled with merchants who still understand that service is more than just a word – it’s everything. A special place to meet with family and friends, to have some fun, share a moment, and experience the best that The Bay Terrace Shopping Center has to offer. It’s all right here. You’re always welcome at The Bay Terrace.
Activities
Kissena Park is a public tennis establishment situated at 156-00 Rose Ave, Queens, NY 11355. There are 12 public tennis courts at this tennis facility. The tennis courts are not lighted.
Kissena Park Tennis Courts
Kissena Park is a public tennis establishment situated at 156-00 Rose Ave, Queens, NY 11355. There are 12 public tennis courts at this tennis facility. The tennis courts are not lighted.
Known in the cycling community as the "track of dreams," the Kissena Velodrome is a 400-meter, state-of-the-art track that boasts asphalt pavement finished with a special acrylic seal coat, landscaping and trees, bleachers, a custom-designed perimeter fence, regulation racing lines, and new drainage. The Kissena Velodrome has been transformed from a patchwork, bumpy track into a sleek, state-of-the-art cycling facility. In 1962, Robert Moses built the Kissena Velodrome on Booth Memorial Avenue at Parsons Boulevard. Kissena racers dominated the 1964 Olympic Trials at the Velodrome, taking five of eight places on the U.S. squad. The Siegfried Stern Kissena Park Bicycle Track was named for Siegfried Stern, treasurer for Hartz Mountain Products and benefactor of many Jewish organizations. The Kissena Velodrome has produced many Olympians and world-class cyclists.
Kissena Velodrome
Known in the cycling community as the "track of dreams," the Kissena Velodrome is a 400-meter, state-of-the-art track that boasts asphalt pavement finished with a special acrylic seal coat, landscaping and trees, bleachers, a custom-designed perimeter fence, regulation racing lines, and new drainage. The Kissena Velodrome has been transformed from a patchwork, bumpy track into a sleek, state-of-the-art cycling facility. In 1962, Robert Moses built the Kissena Velodrome on Booth Memorial Avenue at Parsons Boulevard. Kissena racers dominated the 1964 Olympic Trials at the Velodrome, taking five of eight places on the U.S. squad. The Siegfried Stern Kissena Park Bicycle Track was named for Siegfried Stern, treasurer for Hartz Mountain Products and benefactor of many Jewish organizations. The Kissena Velodrome has produced many Olympians and world-class cyclists.
Kissena Golf Course is located in Flushing, Queens. At 4,665 yards it is relatively short course but it does present quite a challenge for the average golfer. It seems to play harder than most people would imagine. In 2007 new management took over the facility. With a new greens’ superintendent and a completely new staff they were able to improve course conditions dramatically. Most of the regulars at Kissena have indicated that the course is in the best shape it's been in years. This course is a "must play" for 2008.
Kissena Park Golf Course
16415 Booth Memorial Avenue
Kissena Golf Course is located in Flushing, Queens. At 4,665 yards it is relatively short course but it does present quite a challenge for the average golfer. It seems to play harder than most people would imagine. In 2007 new management took over the facility. With a new greens’ superintendent and a completely new staff they were able to improve course conditions dramatically. Most of the regulars at Kissena have indicated that the course is in the best shape it's been in years. This course is a "must play" for 2008.
Established in 1967. Started with fulfilling the needs of local archers in the New York City area. 55 years later, fulfilling the needs of archers around the world. We teach the art of bow and arrow, offering a fun, unique experience whether looking for recreational archery or a competitive league. We offer lessons under the watchful eye of our experienced coaches, to help you develop a life long impression, teaching both form and focus. We also feature our Tuesday Night Tournament with great prizes! We welcome you to bring your own archery equipment, but also have everything you need here, to rent. Please note we have a minimum age of 9 years old. Looking to plan an event of group gathering? Contact us to schedule!
Queens Archery
170-20 39th Ave
Established in 1967. Started with fulfilling the needs of local archers in the New York City area. 55 years later, fulfilling the needs of archers around the world. We teach the art of bow and arrow, offering a fun, unique experience whether looking for recreational archery or a competitive league. We offer lessons under the watchful eye of our experienced coaches, to help you develop a life long impression, teaching both form and focus. We also feature our Tuesday Night Tournament with great prizes! We welcome you to bring your own archery equipment, but also have everything you need here, to rent. Please note we have a minimum age of 9 years old. Looking to plan an event of group gathering? Contact us to schedule!
New York Badminton Center ( NYBC ) was established in 2000 by former China National Badminton Team player Mr. Chibing Wu and other badminton enthusiatic! Mr. Wu had represented China in varies top ranked international tournaments and won numerous national and international titles throughout his professional carrier. Mr. Wu also won and ranked as US top badminton player since he moved to the states. He had over 20 years of coaching experience from high school club level to professional level players. He was head coach for numerous professional badminton clubs in China, Spain & USA. He is one of the few national level ( level 4 ) coach in the USA, the only one in tri-state area, who qualifies in coaching national level players and groups.  NYBC is designated badminton facility with 6 international tournament standard Badminton floor mats on top of 3″ high wood floor elevation for maximum shock absorbing and pressure reduction to knees and ankles.  Center also equipped with Table Tennis, Weights room, kids room, and spacious resting area, large bathrooms. Center opens 7 days all year around. We offers the convenience for players to play on any of the days they prefer. Center is close to public transportation, private parking is also available.   NYBC has players from all over the world: China, India, Pakistan, England, Ireland, Australia, New Zealand, Denmark, Swiss, France, Hungry, Russia, Malaysia, Philippines, Thailand, Indonesia, Israel, Japan, Poland, Brazil, Mexico, Peru, Puerto  Rico, South Africa, etc.  The levels of our players are also varies from beginners to international champions. You do not have to be good to join us. Many of the players convert from tennis, squash; many of them started to learn badminton from scratch and in their 30th or 40th! Even though, majority of players are adults, many of the teenagers from Metropolitan area, other states and other countries have been our club members for years too.So no matter what level you are at, you can always find someone here speaks your language and someone here to be your partner!  NYBC  players participates in major tournaments in New York annually: NYCB TEAM INVITATIONAL TOURNAMENT, NYCB ANNUAL TOURNAMENT – NYCB Championship, NEW YORK OPEN ( USAB Sanctioned ). Our junior team players have actively participated in most intrastate & interstate Junior . All of us, whether won any title or not, enjoyed the experience of being in a team, and being cared by other players and being able to overcome the difficulties. NYBC also provides Private & Group Training classes, Junior After school classes and Summer Camp for all levels. All training classes are coached & directed by Chibing Wu , who had been a professional player for the past 30 years with rich experience as a professional coach from High School teams to National Teams for over 20 years.  There are 5 community level coaches participating in varies types of trainings. All training model are designed to fit into your own schedule and your level of play. Most of our current students participate actively in major tournaments in the country.
NEW YORK BADMINTON CENTER
132-70 34th Avenue
New York Badminton Center ( NYBC ) was established in 2000 by former China National Badminton Team player Mr. Chibing Wu and other badminton enthusiatic! Mr. Wu had represented China in varies top ranked international tournaments and won numerous national and international titles throughout his professional carrier. Mr. Wu also won and ranked as US top badminton player since he moved to the states. He had over 20 years of coaching experience from high school club level to professional level players. He was head coach for numerous professional badminton clubs in China, Spain & USA. He is one of the few national level ( level 4 ) coach in the USA, the only one in tri-state area, who qualifies in coaching national level players and groups.  NYBC is designated badminton facility with 6 international tournament standard Badminton floor mats on top of 3″ high wood floor elevation for maximum shock absorbing and pressure reduction to knees and ankles.  Center also equipped with Table Tennis, Weights room, kids room, and spacious resting area, large bathrooms. Center opens 7 days all year around. We offers the convenience for players to play on any of the days they prefer. Center is close to public transportation, private parking is also available.   NYBC has players from all over the world: China, India, Pakistan, England, Ireland, Australia, New Zealand, Denmark, Swiss, France, Hungry, Russia, Malaysia, Philippines, Thailand, Indonesia, Israel, Japan, Poland, Brazil, Mexico, Peru, Puerto  Rico, South Africa, etc.  The levels of our players are also varies from beginners to international champions. You do not have to be good to join us. Many of the players convert from tennis, squash; many of them started to learn badminton from scratch and in their 30th or 40th! Even though, majority of players are adults, many of the teenagers from Metropolitan area, other states and other countries have been our club members for years too.So no matter what level you are at, you can always find someone here speaks your language and someone here to be your partner!  NYBC  players participates in major tournaments in New York annually: NYCB TEAM INVITATIONAL TOURNAMENT, NYCB ANNUAL TOURNAMENT – NYCB Championship, NEW YORK OPEN ( USAB Sanctioned ). Our junior team players have actively participated in most intrastate & interstate Junior . All of us, whether won any title or not, enjoyed the experience of being in a team, and being cared by other players and being able to overcome the difficulties. NYBC also provides Private & Group Training classes, Junior After school classes and Summer Camp for all levels. All training classes are coached & directed by Chibing Wu , who had been a professional player for the past 30 years with rich experience as a professional coach from High School teams to National Teams for over 20 years.  There are 5 community level coaches participating in varies types of trainings. All training model are designed to fit into your own schedule and your level of play. Most of our current students participate actively in major tournaments in the country.
This architecturally breathtaking arena hosts it all, from hockey games to private skating lessons to youth concert series and events such as Halloween parties, where locals show up in costume and take turns whirling around the rink. Aside from the obvious skating rink, the arena features the World Ice Cafe, a full-service restaurant where visitors can munch while listening to live music.
World Ice Arena
13135 Avery Ave
This architecturally breathtaking arena hosts it all, from hockey games to private skating lessons to youth concert series and events such as Halloween parties, where locals show up in costume and take turns whirling around the rink. Aside from the obvious skating rink, the arena features the World Ice Cafe, a full-service restaurant where visitors can munch while listening to live music.
The World’s Fair Marina is a public marina located at the northern edge of Flushing Meadows-Corona. Conveniently located right off the Grand Central Parkway, this public marina is just north of Citi-Field, home to the MLB’s New York Metropolitans, as well as the USTA National Tennis Center, home of the U.S. Open. Originally a boat basin built in 1939 for the World’s Fair, Robert Moses expanded construction of the marina for the 1964 New York World’s Fair to help accommodate over 800 boats. Since 1999, the NYC Department of Parks & Recreation has operated the World’s Fair Marina. The marina offers many different activities including power boating, kayaking, canoeing, ferries, as well as party boats and even larger yachts such as the Skyline Princess. The World’s Fair Marina location offers public dinner cruises as well as public brunch cruises and lunch cruises. If you are looking for a unique party idea, you can also launch a party boat charter or holiday cruise from this location and enjoy the finest catering on the open seas! Going to a New York dinner cruise, brunch cruise, corporate affair, wedding or special event? The Skyline Princess is located at the World´s Fair Marina in Flushing Meadows, Queens, NY. The marina is directly opposite Citi Field (the new Met´s stadium) and near La Guardia Airport. The World’s Fair Marina is easily accessible from Northern Blvd, the Grand Central Parkway, the Whitestone Expressway and all major highways throughout the metropolitan area. We feature plenty of Free Parking at the marina.
Skyline Cruises
1 World's Fair Marina
The World’s Fair Marina is a public marina located at the northern edge of Flushing Meadows-Corona. Conveniently located right off the Grand Central Parkway, this public marina is just north of Citi-Field, home to the MLB’s New York Metropolitans, as well as the USTA National Tennis Center, home of the U.S. Open. Originally a boat basin built in 1939 for the World’s Fair, Robert Moses expanded construction of the marina for the 1964 New York World’s Fair to help accommodate over 800 boats. Since 1999, the NYC Department of Parks & Recreation has operated the World’s Fair Marina. The marina offers many different activities including power boating, kayaking, canoeing, ferries, as well as party boats and even larger yachts such as the Skyline Princess. The World’s Fair Marina location offers public dinner cruises as well as public brunch cruises and lunch cruises. If you are looking for a unique party idea, you can also launch a party boat charter or holiday cruise from this location and enjoy the finest catering on the open seas! Going to a New York dinner cruise, brunch cruise, corporate affair, wedding or special event? The Skyline Princess is located at the World´s Fair Marina in Flushing Meadows, Queens, NY. The marina is directly opposite Citi Field (the new Met´s stadium) and near La Guardia Airport. The World’s Fair Marina is easily accessible from Northern Blvd, the Grand Central Parkway, the Whitestone Expressway and all major highways throughout the metropolitan area. We feature plenty of Free Parking at the marina.
Transportation
Flushing–Main Street (signed as Main Street on entrances and pillars, and Main St–Flushing on overhead signs) is the eastern terminal on the IRT Flushing Line of the New York City Subway, located at Main Street and Roosevelt Avenue in downtown Flushing, Queens. It is served by the 7 local train at all times and the <7> express train during rush hours in the peak direction. The Flushing–Main Street station was originally built as part of the Dual Contracts between the Interborough Rapid Transit Company (IRT) and the Brooklyn–Manhattan Transit Corporation (BMT). It opened on January 21, 1928, completing the segment of the Flushing Line in Queens. Although plans existed for the line to be extended east of the station, such an extension was never built. The station was renovated in the 1990s. In 2018, it was the busiest single subway station in Queens, the busiest station outside of Manhattan, and the 11th busiest subway station in the system.
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Main St Station
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Flushing–Main Street (signed as Main Street on entrances and pillars, and Main St–Flushing on overhead signs) is the eastern terminal on the IRT Flushing Line of the New York City Subway, located at Main Street and Roosevelt Avenue in downtown Flushing, Queens. It is served by the 7 local train at all times and the <7> express train during rush hours in the peak direction. The Flushing–Main Street station was originally built as part of the Dual Contracts between the Interborough Rapid Transit Company (IRT) and the Brooklyn–Manhattan Transit Corporation (BMT). It opened on January 21, 1928, completing the segment of the Flushing Line in Queens. Although plans existed for the line to be extended east of the station, such an extension was never built. The station was renovated in the 1990s. In 2018, it was the busiest single subway station in Queens, the busiest station outside of Manhattan, and the 11th busiest subway station in the system.
Sightseeing
Main Street is a major north-south street in the borough of Queens in New York City, extending from Queens Boulevard in Briarwood to Northern Boulevard in Flushing. Created in the 17th century as one of Flushing's main roads, Main Street has been lengthened at various points in its existence.
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Flushing Main Street
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Main Street is a major north-south street in the borough of Queens in New York City, extending from Queens Boulevard in Briarwood to Northern Boulevard in Flushing. Created in the 17th century as one of Flushing's main roads, Main Street has been lengthened at various points in its existence.
Kissena Park is an ideal location to both relax and participate in fun outdoor activities.  The beautiful Kissena Lake, flanked by weeping willows and shady trees, creates an idyllic setting to enjoy a sunny day.  Stroll through the park to take in all of the lush flora and fauna and be sure not to miss the historic tree grove.  The dozens of species of trees in the grove are some of the most exotic in the world.  In fact, the grove got its start as part of a 19th century horticultural nursery for the New York region. After taking in the beauty of Kissena Park, get active at one of the park’s many recreational facilities.  Try and beat your best time on the bike at the Kissena Park Velodrome.  Or play a round of golf at the Kissena public course.  And of course there are lots of playgrounds, baseball diamonds, and tennis and handball courts for all to use.  So whether or not you are looking for some action or you’d prefer some rest and relaxation, Kissena Park is the perfect venue.
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Kissena Park
Booth Memorial Avenue
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Kissena Park is an ideal location to both relax and participate in fun outdoor activities.  The beautiful Kissena Lake, flanked by weeping willows and shady trees, creates an idyllic setting to enjoy a sunny day.  Stroll through the park to take in all of the lush flora and fauna and be sure not to miss the historic tree grove.  The dozens of species of trees in the grove are some of the most exotic in the world.  In fact, the grove got its start as part of a 19th century horticultural nursery for the New York region. After taking in the beauty of Kissena Park, get active at one of the park’s many recreational facilities.  Try and beat your best time on the bike at the Kissena Park Velodrome.  Or play a round of golf at the Kissena public course.  And of course there are lots of playgrounds, baseball diamonds, and tennis and handball courts for all to use.  So whether or not you are looking for some action or you’d prefer some rest and relaxation, Kissena Park is the perfect venue. 
Hindu Temple Society of North America, representing Sri Maha Vallabha Ganapati Devasthanam, ( Tamil : ஸ்ரீ மஹா வல்லப கணபதி தேவஸ்தானம். Telugu:శ్రీ మహావల్లభ గణపతి దేవస్థానం Sanskrit: श्री महावल्लभ गणपति देवस्थानम्), at 45–57 Bowne Street, Flushing, Queens, in New York City, claims to be the very first of the traditional Hindu temples in the USA. It is popularly referred to as the Ganesh Temple, Flushing since the main deity is Lord Ganesh. While there are now several Hindu temples in New York City area, this temple continues to be among the most prominent of them. The temple architecture and the rituals follow the South Indian tradition. The temple is visited not only by the Hindus but also those who wish to explore religious diversity in Queens. The very first Jain temple in the U.S., the Jain Center of America, is also located in Queens, in nearby Elmhurst. The temple has a vegetarian restaurant termed the Temple Canteen in the basement which is popular for its South Indian cuisine and for the temple experience. The canteen feeds 4,000 people a week, with as many as 10,000 during the Deepavali (Diwali) holiday.
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The Hindu Temple Society of North America
45-57 Bowne Street
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Hindu Temple Society of North America, representing Sri Maha Vallabha Ganapati Devasthanam, ( Tamil : ஸ்ரீ மஹா வல்லப கணபதி தேவஸ்தானம். Telugu:శ్రీ మహావల్లభ గణపతి దేవస్థానం Sanskrit: श्री महावल्लभ गणपति देवस्थानम्), at 45–57 Bowne Street, Flushing, Queens, in New York City, claims to be the very first of the traditional Hindu temples in the USA. It is popularly referred to as the Ganesh Temple, Flushing since the main deity is Lord Ganesh. While there are now several Hindu temples in New York City area, this temple continues to be among the most prominent of them. The temple architecture and the rituals follow the South Indian tradition. The temple is visited not only by the Hindus but also those who wish to explore religious diversity in Queens. The very first Jain temple in the U.S., the Jain Center of America, is also located in Queens, in nearby Elmhurst. The temple has a vegetarian restaurant termed the Temple Canteen in the basement which is popular for its South Indian cuisine and for the temple experience. The canteen feeds 4,000 people a week, with as many as 10,000 during the Deepavali (Diwali) holiday.
The Queens Public Library (QPL), also known as the Queens Borough Public Library and Queens Library (QL), is the public library for the borough of Queens, and one of three public library systems serving New York City. It is one of the largest library systems in the world by circulation, having loaned 13.5 million items in the 2015 fiscal year, and one of the largest in the country in terms of the size of its collection. According to its website, the library holds about 7.5 million items, of which 1.4 million are at its central library in Jamaica, Queens. It was named "2009 Library of the Year" by Library Journal. The Flushing branch first opened in January, 1902 at Jamaica Ave and Jagger Avenue. It moved 3 times until it settled at its present location in 1998 at 41-17 Main Street, Flushing, New York.
Queens Library at Flushing
41-17 Main Street
The Queens Public Library (QPL), also known as the Queens Borough Public Library and Queens Library (QL), is the public library for the borough of Queens, and one of three public library systems serving New York City. It is one of the largest library systems in the world by circulation, having loaned 13.5 million items in the 2015 fiscal year, and one of the largest in the country in terms of the size of its collection. According to its website, the library holds about 7.5 million items, of which 1.4 million are at its central library in Jamaica, Queens. It was named "2009 Library of the Year" by Library Journal. The Flushing branch first opened in January, 1902 at Jamaica Ave and Jagger Avenue. It moved 3 times until it settled at its present location in 1998 at 41-17 Main Street, Flushing, New York.
Flushing Town Hall is a historic Town Hall located on Northern Boulevard at Linden Place in the Flushing section of the New York City borough of Queens. Formerly, it served as the seat of government of the village of Flushing, established as Vlissingen in 1645, until the consolidation with New York City in 1898. It was built in 1862 and is a 2-story, three-by-six-bay, brick building with basement and attic. A style of architecture that originated in Germany, Rundbogenstil ("round arch style"), was used here and in a number of American buildings of the Civil War Era. The earliest photographs show the building to have been painted a light color. The use of paint was discontinued following adhesion problems during a restoration. A small rear wing was added in 1938 containing a block of jail cells. The front facade features a triple arched portico topped by a classic entablature with low balustrade. It was listed as a New York City Landmark in 1968 and on the National Register of Historic Places in 1972. The building houses the Flushing Council on Culture and the Arts (FCCA). As a member of New York City's Cultural Institutions Group (CIG), the FCCA serves as stewards of Flushing Town Hall, restoring, managing and programming the historic 1862 landmark on behalf of the City of New York. FCCA celebrates the history of Queens as the home of Jazz, by presenting the finest in Jazz performance.
Flushing Town Hall
137-35 Northern Boulevard
Flushing Town Hall is a historic Town Hall located on Northern Boulevard at Linden Place in the Flushing section of the New York City borough of Queens. Formerly, it served as the seat of government of the village of Flushing, established as Vlissingen in 1645, until the consolidation with New York City in 1898. It was built in 1862 and is a 2-story, three-by-six-bay, brick building with basement and attic. A style of architecture that originated in Germany, Rundbogenstil ("round arch style"), was used here and in a number of American buildings of the Civil War Era. The earliest photographs show the building to have been painted a light color. The use of paint was discontinued following adhesion problems during a restoration. A small rear wing was added in 1938 containing a block of jail cells. The front facade features a triple arched portico topped by a classic entablature with low balustrade. It was listed as a New York City Landmark in 1968 and on the National Register of Historic Places in 1972. The building houses the Flushing Council on Culture and the Arts (FCCA). As a member of New York City's Cultural Institutions Group (CIG), the FCCA serves as stewards of Flushing Town Hall, restoring, managing and programming the historic 1862 landmark on behalf of the City of New York. FCCA celebrates the history of Queens as the home of Jazz, by presenting the finest in Jazz performance.
St. George's Church is an intercultural, multilingual Episcopal congregation in Flushing, Queens, New York City, with members from over twenty different nations of origin. A landmark church, it has served an ever-changing congregation for over 300 years.
St. George's Episcopal Church
13532 38th Avenue
St. George's Church is an intercultural, multilingual Episcopal congregation in Flushing, Queens, New York City, with members from over twenty different nations of origin. A landmark church, it has served an ever-changing congregation for over 300 years.
US Post Office-Flushing Main is a historic post office building located at Flushing in Queens County, New York, United States. It was designed and built between 1932 and 1934 by architect Dwight James Baum and William W. Knowles as consulting architects to the Office of the Supervising Architect. It is a symmetrically massed, two story steel frame building clad in oversize handmade red brick with marble trim in the Colonial Revival style. Its main facade features an entrance portico consisting of six Ionic columns that support a full pedimented entablature. The interior features a mural executed in 1933-34 by Vincent Aderente.
United States Postal Service
4165 Main Street
US Post Office-Flushing Main is a historic post office building located at Flushing in Queens County, New York, United States. It was designed and built between 1932 and 1934 by architect Dwight James Baum and William W. Knowles as consulting architects to the Office of the Supervising Architect. It is a symmetrically massed, two story steel frame building clad in oversize handmade red brick with marble trim in the Colonial Revival style. Its main facade features an entrance portico consisting of six Ionic columns that support a full pedimented entablature. The interior features a mural executed in 1933-34 by Vincent Aderente.
The Free Synagogue of Flushing is a historic synagogue located at 41-60 Kissena Boulevard in Flushing, Queens, New York City. It was added to the National Register of Historical Places in 2009. Its establishment is based on the free synagogue movement, started by Stephen Samuel Wise.
Free Synagogue of Flushing
136-23 Sanford Avenue
The Free Synagogue of Flushing is a historic synagogue located at 41-60 Kissena Boulevard in Flushing, Queens, New York City. It was added to the National Register of Historical Places in 2009. Its establishment is based on the free synagogue movement, started by Stephen Samuel Wise.
The Weeping Beech tree that once rooted itself in this park lived for 151 years, from 1847 to 1998 -- one of the City’s few trees to be landmarked. The tree originated at a nobleman’s estate in Beersal, Belgium from whence it was transported to New York City by the efforts of one enterprising gardener. Samuel Bowne Parsons (1819-1907), a prominent horticulturalist and father of Parks Superintendant Samuel Parsons Jr. (1844-1923), obtained the seedling and planted it on the grounds of his renowned nursery. In its maturity, its branches touched the ground and re-rooted, creating a ring of offspring surrounding its immense canopy. In the years before it finally succumbed to old age, it reached sixty feet in height with a “leaf curtain” of eighty feet in diameter. Legend has it that this tree gave rise to generations of Weeping Beeches (Fagus sylvatica) in America.
Margaret I Carman Green
The Weeping Beech tree that once rooted itself in this park lived for 151 years, from 1847 to 1998 -- one of the City’s few trees to be landmarked. The tree originated at a nobleman’s estate in Beersal, Belgium from whence it was transported to New York City by the efforts of one enterprising gardener. Samuel Bowne Parsons (1819-1907), a prominent horticulturalist and father of Parks Superintendant Samuel Parsons Jr. (1844-1923), obtained the seedling and planted it on the grounds of his renowned nursery. In its maturity, its branches touched the ground and re-rooted, creating a ring of offspring surrounding its immense canopy. In the years before it finally succumbed to old age, it reached sixty feet in height with a “leaf curtain” of eighty feet in diameter. Legend has it that this tree gave rise to generations of Weeping Beeches (Fagus sylvatica) in America.
The Bowne House (ca. 1661) is the oldest house in Queens and is among the oldest in New York City and New York State. It was built by John Bowne, who emigrated from England to Boston in 1649 and settled in Flushing, Queens, when New York was under Dutch rule. His family prospered in America: the nine generations born and raised in the house produced businessmen, horticulturists, educators and politicians. Over the course of 300 years, the family left its mark on American culture, participating in events of both regional and national significance -starting with John Bowne’s courageous defense of religious freedom in 1662, an act which inspired the principles later codified in the Bill of Rights, and continuing with subsequent generations’ abolitionist activities and participation in the Underground Railroad.
Bowne House
37-01 Bowne Street
The Bowne House (ca. 1661) is the oldest house in Queens and is among the oldest in New York City and New York State. It was built by John Bowne, who emigrated from England to Boston in 1649 and settled in Flushing, Queens, when New York was under Dutch rule. His family prospered in America: the nine generations born and raised in the house produced businessmen, horticulturists, educators and politicians. Over the course of 300 years, the family left its mark on American culture, participating in events of both regional and national significance -starting with John Bowne’s courageous defense of religious freedom in 1662, an act which inspired the principles later codified in the Bill of Rights, and continuing with subsequent generations’ abolitionist activities and participation in the Underground Railroad.
Founded in 1968 as a not-for-profit organization, the Queens Historical Society (QHS) is the largest and most active historical society in the borough and the only one with a borough-wide scope and impact. It promotes and provides assistance for research into social, political, and economic aspects of Queens history and documents the constant changes that continue to shape the borough. It maintains an archive and library of primary and secondary sources of historical information for students, historians and the public. The organization was founded when a group of concerned citizens and local preservationists joined together to save the historic Kingsland Homestead in Flushing from being demolished. The group, the Kingsland Preservation Committee, would evolve into the Queens Historical Society in the 1970’s. QHS also later became a repository for the former Flushing Historical Society and their collection, as well as the photo collection of the Flushing Garden Club and the Flushing Council Women’s Organization. Today, QHS offers programs geared to a range of ages from elementary school students to senior citizens. Historical, cultural, and artistic aspects of the borough are explored through exhibitions and outreach programs including slide lectures, panel discussions, tours, and concerts. QHS stocks and offers a catalog of history-related publications available for sale as well as other items of historic and cultural interest, QHS also publishes a quarterly newsletter. QHS owns and maintains the Kingsland Homestead, a late 18th-century Long Island Half-House style structure that is honored as being the first New York City landmark in Queens County. It is located in the historic Weeping Beech Park in Flushing, Queens. In addition to changing exhibitions, a period room displays furnishings of the Victorian era. QHS also owns and maintains the landmark Moore-Jackson Cemetery in Woodside, a rare surviving Colonial-era family burial ground established circa 1733.
Queens Historical Society
14335 37th Avenue
Founded in 1968 as a not-for-profit organization, the Queens Historical Society (QHS) is the largest and most active historical society in the borough and the only one with a borough-wide scope and impact. It promotes and provides assistance for research into social, political, and economic aspects of Queens history and documents the constant changes that continue to shape the borough. It maintains an archive and library of primary and secondary sources of historical information for students, historians and the public. The organization was founded when a group of concerned citizens and local preservationists joined together to save the historic Kingsland Homestead in Flushing from being demolished. The group, the Kingsland Preservation Committee, would evolve into the Queens Historical Society in the 1970’s. QHS also later became a repository for the former Flushing Historical Society and their collection, as well as the photo collection of the Flushing Garden Club and the Flushing Council Women’s Organization. Today, QHS offers programs geared to a range of ages from elementary school students to senior citizens. Historical, cultural, and artistic aspects of the borough are explored through exhibitions and outreach programs including slide lectures, panel discussions, tours, and concerts. QHS stocks and offers a catalog of history-related publications available for sale as well as other items of historic and cultural interest, QHS also publishes a quarterly newsletter. QHS owns and maintains the Kingsland Homestead, a late 18th-century Long Island Half-House style structure that is honored as being the first New York City landmark in Queens County. It is located in the historic Weeping Beech Park in Flushing, Queens. In addition to changing exhibitions, a period room displays furnishings of the Victorian era. QHS also owns and maintains the landmark Moore-Jackson Cemetery in Woodside, a rare surviving Colonial-era family burial ground established circa 1733.
Masjidi Hazrati Abu Bakr Siddique is a mosque in Flushing, Queens, New York, United States. It is located at 141-47 33rd Avenue. Masjid Hazrati Abu Bakr Siddique is a 501(c) organization, a community of believers adhering to Islam, the Qur’an and the life traditions of Prophet Muhammad. Masjidi Hazrati Abu Bakr Siddique was established by Afghan, Turkistan, Uzbek immigrants from Afghanistan in 1986 as a community center for religious events and programs. The Mosque, Al-Masjid in Arabic, is the Muslim gathering place for prayer. Al-Masjid simply means “place of prostration.”
Masjid Hazrati Abu Bakr Siddique
14147 33rd Avenue
Masjidi Hazrati Abu Bakr Siddique is a mosque in Flushing, Queens, New York, United States. It is located at 141-47 33rd Avenue. Masjid Hazrati Abu Bakr Siddique is a 501(c) organization, a community of believers adhering to Islam, the Qur’an and the life traditions of Prophet Muhammad. Masjidi Hazrati Abu Bakr Siddique was established by Afghan, Turkistan, Uzbek immigrants from Afghanistan in 1986 as a community center for religious events and programs. The Mosque, Al-Masjid in Arabic, is the Muslim gathering place for prayer. Al-Masjid simply means “place of prostration.”
One of the city's most iconic parks, and the site of two twentieth century World's Fairs, Flushing Meadows Corona Park continues to draw and delight visitors. From historic walks, to scenic trails, to sports and activities, there's always something to do here. You can play soccer, baseball, tennis, volleyball, cricket and more; work out at our recreation center or our indoor pool; explore the park's lakes and trails by foot, bike, or kayak; or visit one of the park's many cultural and civic institutions. Spend your day in a park that has it all!
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Flushing Meadows Park
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One of the city's most iconic parks, and the site of two twentieth century World's Fairs, Flushing Meadows Corona Park continues to draw and delight visitors. From historic walks, to scenic trails, to sports and activities, there's always something to do here. You can play soccer, baseball, tennis, volleyball, cricket and more; work out at our recreation center or our indoor pool; explore the park's lakes and trails by foot, bike, or kayak; or visit one of the park's many cultural and civic institutions. Spend your day in a park that has it all!
Queens Botanical Garden (QBG) is an urban oasis where people, plants, and cultures are celebrated through inspiring gardens, innovative educational programs, and real-world applications of environmental stewardship. QBG is located on property owned by the City of New York, and its operation is made possible in part by public funds provided through the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, Queens Borough President, the New York City Council, State elected officials, the New York State Department of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation, along with corporate, foundation, and individual supporters. Located at the northeast corner of Flushing Meadows-Corona Park in Flushing, QBG evolved from the five-acre “Gardens on Parade” exhibit showcased at the 1939-1940 New York World’s Fair. Officially opening as “The Queens Botanical Garden Society” in 1946 after local residents saved and expanded the original exhibit, the Garden remained at the original World’s Fair site until 1961, when it was moved to its current location on Main Street in Flushing. Among the original plantings taken from the 1939 site are two blue atlas cedars that frame the iconic tree gate sculpture at the Garden’s Main Street entrance today. QBG has become a 39-acre oasis in one of New York City’s most bustling and diverse neighborhoods.
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Queens Botanical Garden
43-50 Main Street
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Queens Botanical Garden (QBG) is an urban oasis where people, plants, and cultures are celebrated through inspiring gardens, innovative educational programs, and real-world applications of environmental stewardship. QBG is located on property owned by the City of New York, and its operation is made possible in part by public funds provided through the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, Queens Borough President, the New York City Council, State elected officials, the New York State Department of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation, along with corporate, foundation, and individual supporters. Located at the northeast corner of Flushing Meadows-Corona Park in Flushing, QBG evolved from the five-acre “Gardens on Parade” exhibit showcased at the 1939-1940 New York World’s Fair. Officially opening as “The Queens Botanical Garden Society” in 1946 after local residents saved and expanded the original exhibit, the Garden remained at the original World’s Fair site until 1961, when it was moved to its current location on Main Street in Flushing. Among the original plantings taken from the 1939 site are two blue atlas cedars that frame the iconic tree gate sculpture at the Garden’s Main Street entrance today. QBG has become a 39-acre oasis in one of New York City’s most bustling and diverse neighborhoods.
The Queens Zoo is an 18-acre (7.3 ha) zoo located in Flushing Meadows–Corona Park in Queens, New York City. The zoo is part of an integrated system of four zoos and one aquarium managed by the Wildlife Conservation Society in partnership with the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation, and is accredited by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA). Constructed on the site of the 1964 New York World's Fair and opened in 1968, it is the first to be designed from the start as a cageless zoo.
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Queens Zoo
53-51 111th Street
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The Queens Zoo is an 18-acre (7.3 ha) zoo located in Flushing Meadows–Corona Park in Queens, New York City. The zoo is part of an integrated system of four zoos and one aquarium managed by the Wildlife Conservation Society in partnership with the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation, and is accredited by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA). Constructed on the site of the 1964 New York World's Fair and opened in 1968, it is the first to be designed from the start as a cageless zoo.
Citi Field is a baseball park located in Flushing Meadows–Corona Park in New York City. Completed in 2009, it is the home field of the New York Mets of the National League East division of Major League Baseball. The stadium was built as a replacement for the adjacent Shea Stadium, which opened in 1964 next to the site of the 1964 New York World's Fair. Citi Field was designed by Populous (then HOK Sport), and is named after Citigroup, a New York financial services company which purchased the naming rights. The $850 million baseball park was funded with $615 million in public subsidies, including the sale of New York City municipal bonds which are to be repaid by the Mets plus interest. The payments will offset property taxes for the lifetime of the park. The Mets are receiving $20 million annually from Citibank in exchange for naming the stadium Citi Field. The first game at Citi Field was on March 29, 2009, with a college baseball game between St. John's and Georgetown. The Mets played their first two games at the ballpark on April 3 and 4, 2009 against the Boston Red Sox as charity exhibition games. The first regular season home game was played on April 13, 2009, against the San Diego Padres. Citi Field hosted the 2013 Major League Baseball All-Star Game, marking the second time the Mets have hosted the event (the first being in 1964, the inaugural season of Shea Stadium).
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Citi Field
123-01 Roosevelt Avenue
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Citi Field is a baseball park located in Flushing Meadows–Corona Park in New York City. Completed in 2009, it is the home field of the New York Mets of the National League East division of Major League Baseball. The stadium was built as a replacement for the adjacent Shea Stadium, which opened in 1964 next to the site of the 1964 New York World's Fair. Citi Field was designed by Populous (then HOK Sport), and is named after Citigroup, a New York financial services company which purchased the naming rights. The $850 million baseball park was funded with $615 million in public subsidies, including the sale of New York City municipal bonds which are to be repaid by the Mets plus interest. The payments will offset property taxes for the lifetime of the park. The Mets are receiving $20 million annually from Citibank in exchange for naming the stadium Citi Field. The first game at Citi Field was on March 29, 2009, with a college baseball game between St. John's and Georgetown. The Mets played their first two games at the ballpark on April 3 and 4, 2009 against the Boston Red Sox as charity exhibition games. The first regular season home game was played on April 13, 2009, against the San Diego Padres. Citi Field hosted the 2013 Major League Baseball All-Star Game, marking the second time the Mets have hosted the event (the first being in 1964, the inaugural season of Shea Stadium).
The USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center is a stadium complex within Flushing Meadows–Corona Park in Queens, New York City, United States. It has been the home of the US Open Grand Slam tennis tournament, played every year in August and September, since 1978 and is operated by the United States Tennis Association (USTA). The facility has 22 courts inside its 46.5 acres (0.188 km2; 0.0727 sq mi) and 12 in the adjoining park. The complex's three stadiums are among the largest tennis stadiums in the world; Arthur Ashe Stadium tops the global list with a listed capacity of 23,200. All 33 courts have used the DecoTurf cushioned acrylic surface since the facility was built in 1978. Near Citi Field (home of the New York Mets) as well as LaGuardia Airport, the tennis center is open to the public for play except during the US Open, junior and wood-racquet competitions. Formerly called the USTA National Tennis Center, the facility was rededicated for Billie Jean King on August 28, 2006.
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Us Open
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The USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center is a stadium complex within Flushing Meadows–Corona Park in Queens, New York City, United States. It has been the home of the US Open Grand Slam tennis tournament, played every year in August and September, since 1978 and is operated by the United States Tennis Association (USTA). The facility has 22 courts inside its 46.5 acres (0.188 km2; 0.0727 sq mi) and 12 in the adjoining park. The complex's three stadiums are among the largest tennis stadiums in the world; Arthur Ashe Stadium tops the global list with a listed capacity of 23,200. All 33 courts have used the DecoTurf cushioned acrylic surface since the facility was built in 1978. Near Citi Field (home of the New York Mets) as well as LaGuardia Airport, the tennis center is open to the public for play except during the US Open, junior and wood-racquet competitions. Formerly called the USTA National Tennis Center, the facility was rededicated for Billie Jean King on August 28, 2006.
The Queens Museum, formerly the Queens Museum of Art, is an art museum and educational center located in Flushing Meadows–Corona Park in the borough of Queens in New York City, United States. The museum was founded in 1972, and has among its permanent exhibitions, the Panorama of the City of New York, a room-sized scale model of the five boroughs originally built for the 1964 New York World's Fair, and repeatedly updated since then. It also has a large archive of artifacts from both World's Fairs, a selection of which is on display.
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Queens Museum
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The Queens Museum, formerly the Queens Museum of Art, is an art museum and educational center located in Flushing Meadows–Corona Park in the borough of Queens in New York City, United States. The museum was founded in 1972, and has among its permanent exhibitions, the Panorama of the City of New York, a room-sized scale model of the five boroughs originally built for the 1964 New York World's Fair, and repeatedly updated since then. It also has a large archive of artifacts from both World's Fairs, a selection of which is on display.
The New York Hall of Science, also known as NYSCI, is a science museum located in Flushing Meadows-Corona Park in the New York City borough of Queens, in the section of the park that is in Corona. It occupies one of the few remaining structures from the 1964 New York World's Fair, and is New York City's only hands-on science and technology center. The more than 400 hands-on exhibits focus on biology, chemistry, and physics.
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New York Hall of Science
47-01 111th Street
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The New York Hall of Science, also known as NYSCI, is a science museum located in Flushing Meadows-Corona Park in the New York City borough of Queens, in the section of the park that is in Corona. It occupies one of the few remaining structures from the 1964 New York World's Fair, and is New York City's only hands-on science and technology center. The more than 400 hands-on exhibits focus on biology, chemistry, and physics.
Kissena Corridor Park consists of two separate corridors that link together much of the parkland in eastern Queens. The western corridor ties Flushing Meadows-Corona Park to Kissena Park, and the eastern corridor continues to connect Cunningham Park on the other side. Although it is composed of two different parts, it is considered a whole, as its sections form a continuous green space together with Kissena Park.
Kissena Corridor Park
Kissena Corridor Park consists of two separate corridors that link together much of the parkland in eastern Queens. The western corridor ties Flushing Meadows-Corona Park to Kissena Park, and the eastern corridor continues to connect Cunningham Park on the other side. Although it is composed of two different parts, it is considered a whole, as its sections form a continuous green space together with Kissena Park.
Culture, sports, nature... and fun! All of these things abound in Cunningham Park, one of the largest parks in Queens.  Assembled between 1928 and 1944 and named Cunningham Park in 1934, the space has developed into headquarters for countless athletic leagues, animals, playmates, and barbecue enthusiasts.   Pick a pleasure and begin your explorations today!
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Cunningham Park
196-10 Union Turnpike
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Culture, sports, nature... and fun! All of these things abound in Cunningham Park, one of the largest parks in Queens.  Assembled between 1928 and 1944 and named Cunningham Park in 1934, the space has developed into headquarters for countless athletic leagues, animals, playmates, and barbecue enthusiasts.   Pick a pleasure and begin your explorations today!
A pristine stretch surrounding a preserved Civil War fortress, Fort Totten Park provides not only recreation and relaxation but a fascinating glimpse into New York’s past. Year-round, New Yorkers flock to Fort Totten Park to enjoy its special events, natural wonders, and historic buildings.  On hot summer days, swimmers can take a dip in the pool and sunbathe around its grassy edges, or take canoes out and paddle along the Long Island Sound. During the winter, bird enthusiasts congregate to watch migrating waterfowl rest before their long journey south. And exploring the fortress and its surrounding buildings remains a unique adventure during any season. Urban Park Rangers lead regular tours of the fortress and the wildlife surrounding it for those who enjoy guided treks, and a visitors’ center inside the park provides helpful information on the park’s past for those prefer to scout alone.
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Fort Totten Park
Totten Avenue
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A pristine stretch surrounding a preserved Civil War fortress, Fort Totten Park provides not only recreation and relaxation but a fascinating glimpse into New York’s past. Year-round, New Yorkers flock to Fort Totten Park to enjoy its special events, natural wonders, and historic buildings.  On hot summer days, swimmers can take a dip in the pool and sunbathe around its grassy edges, or take canoes out and paddle along the Long Island Sound. During the winter, bird enthusiasts congregate to watch migrating waterfowl rest before their long journey south. And exploring the fortress and its surrounding buildings remains a unique adventure during any season. Urban Park Rangers lead regular tours of the fortress and the wildlife surrounding it for those who enjoy guided treks, and a visitors’ center inside the park provides helpful information on the park’s past for those prefer to scout alone.
Queens College (QC) is one of the four-year colleges in the City University of New York system. Its 80-acre campus is located in the Kew Gardens Hills section of Queens, New York City, with a student body that represents over 170 countries. Queens College was established in 1937. It offers undergraduate degrees in 78 majors, master's degrees in 24 departments, 20 doctoral degrees through the CUNY Graduate Center, and a number of advanced certificate programs. The Queens College Athletics and Recreation sponsors 15 men's and women's championship-eligible varsity teams. 62% of undergraduate students graduate within six years.
Queens College, Università della Città di New York
6530 Kissena Boulevard
Queens College (QC) is one of the four-year colleges in the City University of New York system. Its 80-acre campus is located in the Kew Gardens Hills section of Queens, New York City, with a student body that represents over 170 countries. Queens College was established in 1937. It offers undergraduate degrees in 78 majors, master's degrees in 24 departments, 20 doctoral degrees through the CUNY Graduate Center, and a number of advanced certificate programs. The Queens College Athletics and Recreation sponsors 15 men's and women's championship-eligible varsity teams. 62% of undergraduate students graduate within six years.
Queensborough Community College (QCC) is a community college in Bayside, Queens, New York. One of seven community colleges within the City University of New York (CUNY) system, Queensborough enrolls more than 15,400 students and more than 900 Instructional Faculty. Queensborough opened in 1959 as a campus of the State University of New York and in 1965 transferred to CUNY. Its mission is to prepare students to transfer to a four-year institution or enter the work force. The college offers more than 40 associate's degree programs as well as certificate and continuing education programs. Queensborough is regionally accredited by the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools.
Queensborough Community College
222-05 56th Ave
Queensborough Community College (QCC) is a community college in Bayside, Queens, New York. One of seven community colleges within the City University of New York (CUNY) system, Queensborough enrolls more than 15,400 students and more than 900 Instructional Faculty. Queensborough opened in 1959 as a campus of the State University of New York and in 1965 transferred to CUNY. Its mission is to prepare students to transfer to a four-year institution or enter the work force. The college offers more than 40 associate's degree programs as well as certificate and continuing education programs. Queensborough is regionally accredited by the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools.

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MTA Subways and Buses
If you can’t walk to your destination, mass transit is the next-best and next-cheapest way to get around. The City’s rail and bus system is run by the Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) and known as MTA New York City Transit. It’s inexpensive, environmentally friendly and a great way to see sights throughout the five boroughs—and it operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Q65 & Q27 Buses perfectly connect our place and Main Street Subway Station.
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Lyft & Uber Car Services
We recommend taking Lyft or Uber car services to our property or nearby destinations, especially for the first-time visit, as these services are fast and convenient in Queens. It is not likely you will see any yellow taxis easily in Queens.
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Operating Hours of Destinations
Due to Covid-19, the operations of these destinations have been either modified or temporarily closed. Please check the operating hours before you go.
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We are close to airports
We are only 4 miles away from LGA airport and 8 miles away from JFK airport. Booking our place cuts down on traveling time, and you can rest more and not worry about the next day flight.
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COVID-19 Update
COVID-19 is still here, please wear a mask and maintain 6 feet distance in public.